In and out: Pioneer SX-727, SX-750, Denon AVR-1907

I like speakers and I like receivers. For whatever reason I feel fine keeping a large stable of speakers around, but I get the urge periodically to clean out all of the older receivers I have laying around not being enjoyed on a regular basis.

First up was the Pioneer SX-727. This was an example of what some consider the high water mark for Pioneer’s receiver line – heavy metal components, real wood (even on midrange models like this one), thick glass display windows, solid sound. This 727 was no exception. It was built like a tank, and even after 39 years, played solid. It came missing a loudness button but I was able to find one off of eBay for $10. Then it was perfect. Sound quality was high, and the capability of the FM tuner was amazing! I paired it with a set of the Realistic Nova 8s, and the sound was pure vintage. But with everything else in the house, this didn’t get a lot of air time. The pair went to one very happy budding vinyl aficionado.

Pioneer SX 727. What a beautiful machine. this pic is not of mine however...

Pioneer SX 727. What a beautiful machine. this pic is not of mine however…

Pioneer SX 727 rear

Pioneer SX 727 rear

It was interesting to contrast that tank with the Pioneer SX-750, a model in the same spot in Pioneer’s model line from only two years later. Weight was down considerably, the real wood cabinet had been replaced by gossamer vinyl woodgrain stickers, and the rear panel was more basic. Cost cutting had taken hold of the Pioneer line, at least in the lower reaches. The front panel was still high-quality aerospace aluminum, however, and looked the look. The sound was still good, with that characteristic Pioneer thump on the low end. Ironically, neither the -727 or -750 put out anywhere near the effortless bass of my SX-1250 (pre resto) at the same volume level. I never would have expected that, but I guess effortless power reserves do have their place. Who knew that 160wpc could be felt at lower listening levels, or that 45wpc wouldn’t get the job done? The 750 also went home with someone ready to enjoy it for its formidable phono preamp.

My Pioneer SX 750

My Pioneer SX 750

Pioneer SX 750. Plastico woodgrain no match for the real walnut on the 727

Pioneer SX 750. Plastico woodgrain no match for the real walnut on the 727

 

The Denon AVR-1907 was the surprise. For a modern AV receiver ,this thing rocks. Probably weighing in at over 40 lb, this receiver was also biamp capable, meaning that the max 110wpc at 6 ohms could be bridged to 220 by switching the second room speakers to the biamp mode. I never used it for anything other than music playback from my iPod and it impressed with effortless clarity. It had the whole compliment of decoders, Dolby effects, multi-channel speaker outputs and full preamp outs (!) but I never used any of that. The sound and power was great and really complimented the B&W 601s. But for what I used it for it was far too complicated – I never even figured out how to set the bass and treble. It found a willing and happy home. I was sorry to see it go.

Denon AVR-1907. Not much to look at, but good to listen to

Denon AVR-1907. Not much to look at, but good to listen to

Denon AVR-1907. Complicated.

Denon AVR-1907. Complicated.

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~ by silverfacestereo on May 3, 2013.

4 Responses to “In and out: Pioneer SX-727, SX-750, Denon AVR-1907”

  1. How do you remove the set screws from the tuning knob of a Pioneer sx727? What tool?

    Like

  2. I have an SX-750 myself. Great receiver. For listening to vinyl, it blows away any of the modern receivers I had.It’s amazing how good quality never dies. If they only still made them like they did in the 70’s!

    Like

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